Nouns for dinner http://nounsfordinner.com food Thu, 19 Nov 2015 22:04:26 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.3.6 Pomegranate with pine nut and honey salad http://nounsfordinner.com/pomegranate-with-pine-nut-and-honey-salad/ http://nounsfordinner.com/pomegranate-with-pine-nut-and-honey-salad/#comments Thu, 19 Nov 2015 21:08:41 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=425 Pomegranate with pine nut and honey salad

Looking for a healthy snack? Here’s an idea for a pomegranate and pine nut salad. Very quick and very pretty. It comes from the Middle East, where pomegranates signify good luck and prosperity. This salad is served to welcome guests as a sign of hospitality. It’s a really refreshing and light pudding.

 

Ingredients (for two people):

1 pomegranate

2 tbsp pine nuts

Juice from one orange

1 tsp honey

Handful of mint leaves

 

Preparation:

  1. Toast the pine nuts in a dry frying pan until you can smell them, don’t let them burn.
  2. Cut the pomegranate in half, cup it in your hand with the seed side facing down, and hit it with a wooden spoon until they all fall out, catching them in a bowl. Get rid of any pith that makes it through.
  3. Add pine nuts.
  4. Juice the orange, in a small bowl whisk the honey into the juice and add to the pomegranate and pine nuts. Mix.
  5. Chop the mint and sprinkle it on top of the salad.

 

Pomegranate with pine nut and honey salad

pomegranate salad with honey1

Original article: Pomegranate with pine nut and honey salad

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Mint syrup http://nounsfordinner.com/mint-syrup/ http://nounsfordinner.com/mint-syrup/#comments Sat, 24 Oct 2015 14:02:08 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=387 Mint syrup

It is always good to have fresh mint in the kitchen, especially when making drinks. With this recipe you can keep the freshness of mint all through the winter. Also, it makes a great gift when given with a bottle of spirit.

 

Ingrediens:

100g mint leaves  (around 5 bunches of mint)

500g white sugar

2l water

100ml lemon juice

 

Method

Prepare your mint leaves, wash and dry them, then chop them finely .

The the water to the boil, add 500g of sugar and bring to a simmer, then stir until the sugar has dissolved. Keep stirring until it stars to thicken, then add the lemon juice and boil for 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat, cool slightly, and add mint leaves when it’s still warm but not hot. Keep in a cool place, covered, for 24 hours.

The next day, strain the liquid through a wire-mesh sieve or muslin fabric to remove the small bits. Reboil the mint syrup again and pour into sterilised small bottles.

The mint syrup will keep refrigerated for 1 month.

 

Mint syrup

Mint syrup

Mint syrup

Mint syrup

Mint syrup

Original article: Mint syrup

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Quick Brined Chicken http://nounsfordinner.com/quick-brined-chicken/ http://nounsfordinner.com/quick-brined-chicken/#comments Wed, 09 Sep 2015 21:51:07 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=373 Like it or not, planning ahead is not always possible in the kitchen.  Things come up, you see something massively discounted and you can’t say no, or the sofa’s too comfy. It’s therefore important to have some tricks up your sleeve for shaving off hours from the usually time-heavy tasks. Let’s face it, a supermarket chicken tastes of very little. That said, roast chicken is fantastic, and being able to make a flavourless bird suddenly become something altogether different in the space of a couple of hours is a miracle.

Of course an overnight brine is better, but when time is against you, you can’t go wrong with this. The flavours penetrate the bird, it’s perfectly seasoned throughout, and the texture of the meat is much better with dryness no longer an issue. The sciencey bit, diffusion, also makes those wasted Biology classes of years gone feel like they were all worth it.

This works just as well for a whole chicken ready for roasting as it does for a whole load of chicken legs and thighs. Also, it’s very flexible. Stick to the basic recipe for water, sugar and salt, but you can mix and match all of the other aromatics to your own tastes or what you have handy.

Ingredients

500ml water

100g salt

50g brown sugar

4 cloves of garlic, lightly crushed in their skins

1 onion, quartered

A handful of herbs, we like a mix of thyme and sage

1 tbsp each of black pepper corns and coriander seeds, toasted then lightly crushed

1 lemon, halved

2 bay leaves

1 whole chicken

Method

1. Combine all the ingredients, bar the chicken, in a saucepan, and bring to the boil, ensuring that all the sugar and salt has dissolved. Turn off the heat when it comes to the boil and leave for 10-15 mins to infuse.

2. Pour in 500 ml more of cold water, along with a good handful or two of ice cubes, and stir until melted.

3. Pour the brine into a large sealable food bag or a large plastic container, then add the chicken, topping up the water as needed to make sure it’s completely submerged. Putting a side plate on top of it is a good idea if it keeps bobbing up in the plastic container. Leave it for 3 hours at room temperature to let it do its thing.

4. When ready, discard the brine and pat the bird dry. It’s now ready for whatever you want to do with it. For a great roast, rub the chicken with a little olive oil and season, and put on top of some chunkily chopped root vegetables and onions and a few peeled cloves of garlic, lightly coated in olive oil. Put into a pre-heated 240°C oven for 15 minutes, before turning it down to 200°C and cooking until the juices run clear or the internal temperature is 74°C/165°F, around 1 hour (depending on the bird’s size).

Quick Brined Chicken

Quick Brined Chicken

Original article: Quick Brined Chicken

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Rose crescent rolls http://nounsfordinner.com/rose-crescent-rolls/ http://nounsfordinner.com/rose-crescent-rolls/#comments Mon, 03 Aug 2015 18:57:28 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=236 Rose crescent rolls

This is a recipe for small crescent rolls, very soft and buttery, ideal for breakfast or pudding. They’re like a small croissants but more fluffy than flaky.

 

Ingredients

250g plain white flour

125g butter, grated

8g dried yeast

60g milk

1 tsp sugar

2 tbsp icing sugar

1 egg

Rose Petal Confiture

 

Gently warm the milk, then stir in the dried yeast and the tsp of sugar.  Cover, and leave to rise for 15 min until frothy.

In a large bowl, mix the flour with butter, rubbing with your fingertips until it looks like breadcrumbs. In a different bowl, whisk together the egg and icing sugar until smooth, then pour both it and the yeast mixture into the bowl with flour. Knead the dough is smooth and soft, around 8-10 mins. Cover the dough, and put into the fridge for 2 hours.

Preheat the oven to 200’C.

Take your dough from the fridge, place on a lightly floured surface, and then divide into 3 pieces.

One by one, roll each piece out into a circle, around 3-4mm thick, and cut into 8 pieces (like a pizza). Put a tsp of rose confiture on the wider edge and roll it in, starting from the outside edge of the triangle. Once rolled, curl the roll slightly into a crescent shape. Place on a baking paper or greased non-stick baking tray. Brush with melted butter, and bake for 15 min.  until golden brown.

Cool on a wire rack before serving.

Rose crescent rolls

Rose crescent rolls

Rose crescent rolls

Rose crescent rolls

 

Original article: Rose crescent rolls

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Rose petal confiture http://nounsfordinner.com/rose-petal-confiture/ http://nounsfordinner.com/rose-petal-confiture/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:31:24 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=38 This is a recipe taken from my Krakovian grandmother who used to pick rose petals from all the rose bushes that grew around her neighbourhood. Confiture is ideal as a filling for donuts and croissants.

 

Ingredients:

100 g rose petals

200 g custard sugar

6 tsp lemon juice

 

Even though I was very young I still remember her recipe which is extra simple. Just remember to keep a ratio 1:2 of rose petals to sugar.

You will need a makitra or pestle and mortar, clean your petals from dust and sand grains, remove the white part of petal (it gives a bitter taste), combine sugar with petals and crush them about 15 minutes into a fine paste, until you cannot feel lumps of sugar. Also, you could sprinkle the petals with lemon juice and leave them until the juice precipitate, and then start crushing.

Rose petal jam

Rose petal jam

Rose petal jam

Rose petal jam

 

Keep in cool and cold place or in the fridge.

 

Original article: Rose petal confiture

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Hot Smoked Chicken http://nounsfordinner.com/hot-smoked-chicken/ http://nounsfordinner.com/hot-smoked-chicken/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:30:42 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=34 Hot Smoked Chicken

 

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The 15 minute cure.

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Pecan wood chips

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Soaked chips

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Original article: Hot Smoked Chicken

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Chicken Liver Lasagne http://nounsfordinner.com/chicken-liver-lasagne/ http://nounsfordinner.com/chicken-liver-lasagne/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:29:02 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=28 Chicken Liver Lasagne

 

I first made Felicity Cloake’s perfect bolognaise recipe a couple of months ago and got the idea to up the chicken livers with the richness they gave the sauce. Chicken livers are dead cheap, and if my Mum’s taught me anything, it’s that a dinner tastes all the better when you’ve saved some pennies. Don’t shy away from liver because of greasy, rubbery memories of youth – they really benefit from long and low cooking, with the texture becoming meltingly soft and succulent. You could, of course, just use the sauce with some pasta, as it’s a great thing to make on a Sunday, leave to develop its rich flavours overnight, then have a quick but hearty meal after a long first day back at work on a Monday evening.

Ingredients:

For the chicken liver sauce:
500g chicken livers, cleaned and finely chopped
100g of bacon, finely diced
1 large onion, finely diced
1 carrot, finely diced
1 stick of celery, finely diced
2 tbsp olive oil
2 bay leaves
100ml milk
200ml dry vermouth
2 tins of tomatoes
Nutmeg

For the béchamel:
750ml whole milk
50g butter
50g plain flour
1 small onion, very finely chopped
Nutmeg
12 lasagne sheets
Parmesan

1. Add the oil to a large casserole, and gently fry the bacon until the fat has rendered into the pan. Add the onion, and soften over a medium heat for around 5 minutes, before adding the carrot and celery and softening them for 10 minutes more. Add the bay leaves and stir until the scent hits you.

2. Preheat the oven to 150°C. Add the chopped livers to the pan, turning the heat up slightly, and frying until slightly browned. Add the milk to the pan, and simmer until the liquid has evaporated, around 20 minutes. Pour in the vermouth and both tins of tomatoes, season well, and finely grate around a quarter of a nutmeg into the pan. Stir well, bring to a simmer, cover, then put into the oven. Cook for 3 hours, checking at hourly intervals to make sure there is enough liquid in the pan. If not, add a splash of water.

3. When the sauce has about 45 minutes left, melt the butter in a sauce pan, add the onion, and soften over a low heat for 15 minutes, being careful not to let them brown. Add the flour, cooking for 1-2 minutes, before slowly adding the milk, whisking as you go. Once you have added all of the milk, keep stirring until it comes to the boil, before turning the heat down and simmering for 10 minutes. Season, and grate another quarter of the nutmeg into the sauce. When the chicken liver sauce is ready, remove the pan and turn the oven up to 200°C.

4. Bring a large pan of well salted water to the boil, and grease a large baking dish with olive oil. Smooth a thin layer of béchamel across the bottom of the dish. When the water is boiling rapidly, add the lasagne sheets 4 at a time, blanching for 1 minute until pliable. Put them on top of the first layer of béchamel, followed a third of chicken liver sauce, then a quarter of the remaining béchamel. Repeat the whole process twice more, but finishing with half of the béchamel on top. Cover the top with grated parmesan, then cook in the oven for 30-40 minutes, until the top is nicely golden.

5. Leave to cool for 20 minutes, and serve with salad.

 

 

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Original article: Chicken Liver Lasagne

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Broccoli Soup http://nounsfordinner.com/broccoli-soup/ http://nounsfordinner.com/broccoli-soup/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:27:48 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=24 This is a super quick Gordon Ramsay recipe we keep coming back to, mainly because it only has three ingredients and it feels like you’re cheating.

Ingredients:

2 heads of broccoli, cut into florets

3 tsp fine salt

Water

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Bring a large pasta pan of water to the boil with 2 tsp of the salt. Add the broccoli, then the final tsp of salt, and bring back to the boil.

Boil for 3-4 min until the broccoli is just cooked. A knife slips right through. Don’t drain the water away!

Use a slotted spoon to put the broccoli in a blender. Add enough of the cooking water up to half way in the blender, and blend until smooth and velvety. Make sure the lid is on tight!

Pour into bowls, and top with black pepper and olive oil.

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Original article: Broccoli Soup

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Gołąbki http://nounsfordinner.com/golabki/ http://nounsfordinner.com/golabki/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:26:35 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=20 Gołąbki

A traditional Polish classic. Gołąbki means ‘little pigeons’.

Ingredients:

500g of mince, 250g each of beef and pork is best

1 onion, finely chopped

2 cloves of garlic, finely chopped

200g rice, preboiled for 5 mins (We use basmati for everything)

5 sprigs of thyme, leaves removed

1 Savoy Cabbage, seperated into leaves

2 tins of tomatoes

200ml stock, chicken or veg.

1 onion, finely chopped

1 bay leaf

Olive Oil, 1 tbsp

Cider vinegar, a splash

Preparation:

Bring a large pan of well salted water to the boil.

Mix the first 5 ingredients in a bowl and season well.

Heat the oil in a large pan or frying pan with a lid, and soften the second onion with a pinch of salt over a medium flame. As the onion softens, blanch the cabbage leaves, 3 or 4 at a time, for 1-2 minutes. Drain well.

Throw in the bay leaf with the softening onions and cook until you catch its smell, about 1 minute, then tip in the tinned tomatoes and stock. Season well with pepper, but taste for salt. Leave to bubble until reduced and thickened.

While the sauce thickens, take a cabbage leaf, one at a time, and a golf ball sized piece of the meat mixture. Place the mixture in the curl at the base of the leaf, wrap the sides snuggly around, and roll it up. Place it aside, seam side down, and repeat until you run out of mixture (hopefully before the leaves!).

Taste the sauce for seasoning, then stir through the splash of vinegar, before placing the cabbage parcels on top of the sauce, as tightly as possible. Don’t worry about man-handling them, it’s much better than them unraveling while cooking. Put the lid on the pan, turn down the heat, and poach the gołąbki for around 40 minutes until cooked through.

Serve with the sauce for a light dinner, or with butter bean mash for something a bit more substantial.

2015-05-17 17.33.51 2015-05-17 16.50.28 2015-05-17 17.29.34 2015-05-17 20.02.10

Original article: Gołąbki

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Wild garlic http://nounsfordinner.com/wild-garlic/ http://nounsfordinner.com/wild-garlic/#comments Tue, 21 Jul 2015 18:22:40 +0000 http://nounsfordinner.com/?p=16 Every spring we look for wild garlic. We recently found it in Blaise Castle Estate, a forest just north of Bristol, and the place was absolutely carpeted with it.

Try as we might to take some home and get some going in a plant pot outside the front door, it’s already died a death. I suppose some things just need to be grabbed from the forest floor themself. Then again, the smell you get while filling as many bags as you can is one of the best things I know for inspiration for new recipes.

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Original article: Wild garlic

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